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New Concussion Guidelines for Children and Teens: Keep Them Off the Field!

An international panel of neurologists, updating their recommendations on concussion care in the May issue of The British Journal of Sports Medicine, said that any athlete 18 or younger who was believed to have sustained a concussion during a game or practice should never be allowed to return to the playing field the same day.

The group had previously said that such athletes could return if cleared by a doctor or certified athletic trainer, An international panel of neurologists, updating their recommendations on concussion care in the May issue of The British Journal of Sports Medicine, said that any athlete 18 or younger who was believed to have sustained a concussion during a game or practice should never be allowed to return to the playing field the same day. 

The new consensus is from the International Conference on Concussion in Sports.

The group had previously said that such athletes could return if cleared by a doctor or certified athletic trainer, but now contend that such determinations are too difficult and dangerous for same-day return to be considered safe.

When it comes to concussions, children and teens require different treatment, according to  the international experts who recently published their consensus recommendations. The British Journal of Sports Medicine's new guidelines say children and teens must be strictly monitored and activities restricted until fully healed. These restrictions include no return to the field of play, no return to school, and no cognitive activity.

The guidelines also point to the important role parents, coaches, and teachers play in assessing and treating young athletes."

For children and adolescents, the guidance strongly reiterates several key points for coaches, parents, and physicians:

  • Injury to the developing brain, especially repeat concussions, may increase the risk of long term effects in children, so no return-to-play until completely symptom free.
  • No child or adolescent athlete should ever return to play on the same day of an injury -- regardless of level of athletic performance. Children and adolescents may need a longer period of full rest and then gradual return to normal activities than adults.
  • For children, "cognitive rest" is a key to recovery. While restrictions on physical activity restrictions are also important, cognitive rest must be carefully adhered to, including limits on cognitive stressors such as academic activities and at-home/social activities including text messaging, video games, and television watching.

The group's recommendations for children and adolescents were based on the fact that though 80 to 90 percent of adult concussions resolve in seven to 10 days, for children and adolescents, the recovery time is often longer. In all cases, the decision to "return-to-play" should be made based on the individual's progress, not a standard time period. Careful post-injury evaluation of the injured student-athlete is essential.

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