Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports, Brain Injury Latest Medical News, Brain Injury Lawyers and Law

Frank Gifford and CTE : It's time that the NFL gets serious

Former professional football player and TV commentator Frank Gifford, who died in August at age 84, suffered from Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease.  The only known cause of this condition is repetitive head trauma.  Gifford played in the NFL for 12 years and during that time suffered from repetitive head trauma.

“We as a family made the difficult decision to have his brain studied in hopes of contributing to the advancement of medical research concerning the link between football and traumatic brain injury,” Gifford’s family said in a statement released Wednesday.

Although all the details of Frank Gifford’s condition in the last years of his life are not known, the fact that CTE was found on autopsy adds further weight to the mounting evidence that football is a concussion delivery system causing permanent consequences to players.  The fact that Gifford and all players diagnosed with this condition past the settlement date in the NFL class action concussion litigation is further proof that the settlement that was reached was unfair and needs to be rejected by the United States Third Circuit Court of Appeals.   

The danger of CTE is something that the NFL can no longer hide from all ignore.  Players with this condition must be compensated and effective measures must be put in place to reduce to present and future players.  It’s time to end the double talk of the NFL and get serious about head injury and brain damage.  

The family said it decided to disclose his condition “to honor Frank’s legacy of promoting player safety dating back to his involvement in the formation of the NFL Players Association in the 1950s.”

My partner, Shana De Caro and I authored the amicus brief on behalf of the Brain Injury Association of America arguing against the NFL settlement. We argued to the court that the settlement was junk science and was not a fair or balanced settlement for players suffering from brain damage.

For more information, read the story on ESPN: Hall of Fame player Frank Gifford suffered from CTE, family says.

November 25, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports, Brain Injury Lawyers and Law, Brain Injury Prevention, Current Affairs

NFL influences Sony in Production of Concussion Movie

The NY Times reports this evening that they have discovered Wiki leaks showing how the NFL pressured Sony to alter their upcoming film, Concussion which documents the discovery of the link between professional football and the development of CTE.  Rad the full article Sony Altered ‘Concussion’ Film to Deter N.F.L. Protests, Emails Show

Unless the NFL is placed under oath, the public will never know the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth about what the NFL knew and when they knew it.

September 1, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury Association Information, Brain Injury Events

Brain Injury Professional Symposium

The Brain Injury Association of New York State (BIANYS) will be hosting a full day professional symposium, Latest Developments in Brain Injury: Identification, Rehabilitation and Treatment on June 4, 2015 in Albany, New York at the Marriott Hotel.  

I am co-chair of this program along with Steven Flanagan, M.D. Professor and Chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center.

The program is intended for all professionals involved in brain injury identification, treatment and rehabilitation.  It brings together some of the leading experts to discuss issued of brain injury epidemiology; sports concussions; cerebral imaging and traumatic brain injury; the role of neuropsychology in brain injury; management of behavioral problems; support for caregivers and family members and the latest research. 

Further information can be obtained at the web site of the Brain Injury Association of New York State.

March 31, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports, Brain Injury Lawyers and Law, Brain Injury Legislative News, Brain Injury Prevention

NY Times Editorial--Parents Need to Make Important Decisions When It Comes to the Risk of Head Injury and Brain Damage

Today's New York Times contains an important editorial on the silent dangers of concussions while engaged in any contact sport.

Here is a portion of that editorial:

Beyond the pro game, the decision by Mr. Borland to quit after one season to protect his health should be carefully noted by parents of the hundreds of thousands of youngsters eager to play each year at the peewee, high school and college levels. Research published in January in the medical journal Neurology found that former professionals who started playing before the age of 12 performed “significantly worse” in mental dexterity tests than those who began tackle football later, according to a study by the Boston University School of Medicine. Even in the absence of diagnosed concussions, high school players showed measurable brain changes after just a single season of tackle play, according to a separate study last December by the Wake Forest School of Medicine.

March 22, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports

Immediate Affects of Concussions Not Always Apparent

A new study published in  in the American Journal of Sports Medicine examines the performance of baseball players following their return to play after a concussion.  Concussions may linger among professional baseball players

March 21, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports

NFL admits they can't track concussions with helmet technology

According to published reports, the National Football League has suspended a program to track concussions with the use of helmet sensors.  The sensors are ineffective in predicting concussions.

Helmets cannot prevent concussions and current technology cannot provide accurate information concerning the multiple forces being applied to the brain upon impact.  In fact, since it is the brain moving within the skull that causes brain damage, an impact need not occur for a concussion to take place.

Simply put, football is a concussion delivery system. Helmets despite all of the rhetoric on the part of the NFL do not make the sport safe.

You can read the full story by clicking here.

February 24, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports

NFL is sending wrong message to our nation's youth

Honored to be quoted in today’s New York Times on the dangers of football to our nation's youth. To Allay Fears, NFL Huddles With Mothers. Despite the marketing attempts by the NFL to create an illusion that football can be made safe, it cannot be. Football is a concussion delivery system!


As we approach the Super Bowl and the focus is on exciting and controversial new ads and whether the NE Patriots were culpable in the deflation of footballs, it might be better to concentrate on the disabling injuries sustained by players and the implications of the message that this new marketing scheme sends to parents and children about the safety of the sport.



January 29, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports, Brain Injury Broadcasts, Brain Injury Lawyers and Law

Proposed NFL settlement a bad deal for players, says attorney specializing in brain injury

Listen to my interview on The Pulse discussing the unfairness of the NFL Settlement.

November 20, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury Latest Medical News, Brain Injury Rehabilitation, Brain Injury Veteran Issues

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy-not effective in treating post concussive brain injury according to new study

Over the years there has been much interest and controversy in the use of high pressure oxygen therapy (hyperbaric oxygen therapy) for the treatment of traumatic brain injury.

According to a new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association –Internal Medicine (JAMA Internal Medicine) oxygen therapy administered in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber is not any more effective than compressed air for the treatment of those suffering from post-concussive traumatic brain injury.

The research involved 72 service members with chronic post-concussive symptoms.  The researchers found that the service members who received high pressure oxygen therapy did not better than patients who were treated with only slightly pressured regular air leading the physicians to conclude that there was only a placebo effect for the use of oxygen therapy in both groups.

The research is the latest in a series of studies sponsored by the Defense Department to determine the effect of oxygen therapy following a traumatic brain injury.

November 17, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brain Injury & Concussions, Brain Injury and Sports, Brain Injury Events

Jim McMahon and Jeremy Roenick Launch Players Against Concussions (PAC) Foundation To Support Concussion Awareness and Prevention—Kickoff event scheduled for Monday, October 6th in Westchester, New York

Players Against Concussions (PAC) is a new nonprofit organization founded by Super Bowl-winning quarterback Jim McMahon and NHL All-Star Jeremy Roenick with the goal of preserving sports while making them safer

The PAC mission begins on Monday, October 6th, when celebrities and professional athletes from across the country converge on the Pelham Country Club in Westchester, New York to participate in the First Annual Players Against Concussions Golf Outing.

A morning brunch and press conference is scheduled from from 10am – Noon, followed by an afternoon round of golf, and will conclude with a cocktail hour and dinner beginning at 5pm.

“This is a deeply personal issue for me as both a player and a parent,” said McMahon. “I loved every minute of the football I played as a kid and during my professional career, but I’ve also felt the effects of the concussions I suffered on the field. I’ve seen the lasting effects on teammates and friends, and now I see the statistics that point toward an epidemic of concussions among young athletes. The idea that kids are sustaining head injuries that have the potential to cause permanent, lifelong damage is just unacceptable. We know many of these injuries are preventable, and in terms of protection, we know we can do better through research and innovation. The goal of PAC is to keep athletes of all ages playing the sports they love, but without having to risk the lifelong, debilitating effects of head injuries.”

For more information on PAC, or to request RSVP for the October 6th Players Against Concussions Golf Outing, please contact Mark Ballard or Sabrina Levine at 212-680-0179 or email

October 3, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack