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Children who suffer traumatic brain injury more likely to engage in criminal conduct in adulthood

A news report from New Zealand reports research showing that individuals who suffer a traumatic brain injury as a child are more likely to commit offenses as adults.

According to the article, Professor Randolph Grace of the University of Canterbury, and Dr Audrey McKinlay from Melbourne's Monash University, studied Canterbury children who had experienced a brain injury as a child from birth to 17 years old.

The participants were now 18 years or older and more than five years had passed since their injury.

Dr Grace said there is "increasing evidence" childhood TPI can have negative impacts during adulthood.

"We found traumatic brain injury (TBI)  was significantly associated with an increased risk of offending behaviour. Our analysis revealed that for people with moderate to severe TBI the strongest predictors of offending behaviour was the TBI status - higher levels of malevolent aggression and lower levels of social anxiety” according to Dr. Grace.

Read the full story by clicking here.

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